Grand Teton National Park. Fujifilm X-T1, 35mm lens, in-camera panorama (which did not quite blend perfectly in the sky)

Grand Teton National Park. Fujifilm X-T1, 35mm lens, in-camera panorama (the sky has a few blending problems)

From Yellowstone, we drove south to spend the night in Jackson Hole in Wyoming as staying inside Yellowstone was very expensive. Turns out, it is a rather long drive from Yellowstone to Jackson Hole – especially when yours truly have a tendency to get hangry! It also turns out, that we passed some rather extraordinary mountains of the imagination in the blackness of the night. So we decided to hang around some more days and explore the incredible Grand Teton National Park.

Everyone who has ever seen a landscape photograph or two is probably familiar with Ansel Adams’ Snake River picture, it is that famous. We ended up at Snake River Lookout at sunset, joining a small tripod brigade that captured a frame every second during a 25 minute session – then promptly got in their cars and took off when the light was about to get really good. So we had the whole place for ourselves as dusk gave way to night. It was so beautiful we almost forgot just how cold it was, only a few degrees above freezing.

If you are in Yellowstone, then definitely do not miss Grand Teton. I really want to go back here and go hiking for weeks. Just remember, it is a long drive down from Yellowstone and one can get very hangry!

Stunning view and it appears I had just discovered the pano function on my camera!

Stunning view and it appears I had just discovered the pano function on my camera!

Charlene posing in the freezing but gorgeous sunset (not as gorgeous as she is though!)

Charlene posing in the freezing but beautiful sunset (that still pales in comparison to my magical better half)

Tripods and cable releases at the ready, fire away!

Tripods and cable releases at the ready, fire away!

My take on the Ansel classic view. The scenery has changed a fair bit since 1942 - and I suck at landscapes. But the view is breathtaking.

My take on the Ansel classic view. The scenery has changed a fair bit since 1942 – and I suck at landscapes. But the view is breathtaking.

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